UK: With the ever growing DNA database, we could all be future criminals…

More than 300 children a day have their DNA taken by the police and added to the national database.

Already 412,670 youngsters under 15 have their genetic profiles stored.

Once 15 to 17-year-olds are added, the total rises to an astonishing 1.1million, according to Freedom of Information replies revealed yesterday.

The DNA samples, from children as young as ten, are kept regardless of whether or not they were ever charged.
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UK: Police chiefs secretly ordered to keep unlawful DNA of 850,000 innocent people…

Police have secretly been told to continue with the unlawful ‘Big Brother’ policy of indefinitely storing DNA samples taken from entirely innocent people.

It is more than seven months since European judges ruled that DNA taken from 850,000 people who were not convicted of any crime could not be stored for life.

But a leaked letter by one of the country’s most senior policing officials reveals that forces have been warned against starting to destroy the unlawful samples.

Chief constables have been ‘strongly advised’ they should stick to the old rules allowing blanket retention of DNA samples until at least 2010.
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UK: Wrongly accused people could have DNA on database for 12 years…

The DNA profiles of people released without charge or found not guilty by a court could be stored for up to 12 years on a national police database.

The proposal, announced by Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary, is in response to a European court ruling that criticised the Government for keeping genetic records of innocent people.

Opponents accused ministers of defying the spirit of the court’s decision by drawing a distinction between DNA samples, which will be destroyed, and the genetic profiles they generate.

The judgment last year ruled that the indefinite storage of samples, profiles and fingerprints of everyone arrested was unlawful.
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F.B.I. and States Vastly Expand DNA Databases…

Law enforcement officials are vastly expanding their collection of DNA to include millions more people who have been arrested or detained but not yet convicted. The move, intended to help solve more crimes, is raising concerns about the privacy of petty offenders and people who are presumed innocent.

Until now, the federal government genetically tracked only convicts. But starting this month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation will join 15 states that collect DNA samples from those awaiting trial and will collect DNA from detained immigrants — the vanguard of a growing class of genetic registrants.

The F.B.I., with a DNA database of 6.7 million profiles, expects to accelerate its growth rate from 80,000 new entries a year to 1.2 million by 2012 — a 17-fold increase. F.B.I. officials say they expect DNA processing backlogs — which now stand at more than 500,000 cases — to increase.
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UK: Five million people now on DNA database…

Figures released by the Home Office showed that there are now 5.1 million profiles on the database – up 1.4 million since February 2007.

The Home Office estimates that because of duplicates there are about 13 per cent more profiles than individuals on the database.

However, the new figures are likely to lead to increasing pressure from civil liberties campaigners, who claim that retaining innocent people’s DNA is a breach of their human rights.

Since April 2004 anyone who is arrested for a recordable offence can be swabbed for their DNA, which is held indefinitely by the National Policing Improvement Agency.

In November last year, the number of profiles held on the database was estimated to be 4.4 million, but 850,000 of those belonged to people who were never charged, acquitted or had the case dropped.
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