MALI – France Fights for Rothschild Gold

FRENCH TROOPS IN MALI – After six days of aerial attacks, on January 16, 2013, French troops began to engage the Islamist rebels whose advances to the south are threatening to overthrow the unelected military regime – and the Rothschild-owned gold mines.

by Christopher Bollyn
Published: Jan. 19, 2013 – bollyn.com

The real reason for the French military intervention in Mali is to protect the foreign-owned gold mining operations, which produce hundreds of thousands of ounces of gold for the owners per year.

MALI IS ‘GOLD COUNTRY’ – Foreign investors profit from the gold of Mali while its people wallow in poverty.  Nine out of ten people in Mali live in dire poverty and 72 percent of the population survives on less than a dollar a day.  Ninety percent of the Malian population is Muslim. 

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NATO’s War on Libya is Directed against China: AFRICOM and the Threat to China’s National Energy Security

The Washington-led decision by NATO to bomb Gaddafi’s Libya into submission over recent months, at an estimated cost to US taxpayers of at least $1 billion, has little if anything to do with what the Obama Administration claims was a mission to “protect innocent civilians.” In reality it is part of a larger strategic assault by NATO and by the Pentagon in particular to entirely control China’s economic achilles heel, namely China’s strategic dependence on large volumes of imported crude oil and gas. Today China is the world’s second largest importer of oil after the United States and the gap is rapidly closing.

by F. William Engdahl
Published: Sep. 25, 2011 – Global Research

If we take a careful look at a map of Africa and also look at the African organization of the new Pentagon Africa Command—AFRICOM—the pattern that emerges is a careful strategy of controlling one of China’s most strategically important oil and raw materials sources.

NATO’s Libya campaign was and is all about oil. But not about simply controlling Libyan high-grade crude because the USA is nervous about reliable foreign supplies. It rather is about controlling China’s free access to long-term oil imports from Africa and from the Middle East. In other words, it is about controlling China itself.

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Unending “9/11s”: “A Sad Kind of Freedom.”

“You love your country
as the nearest, most precious thing to you.
But one day, for example,
they may endorse it over to America,
and you, too, with your great freedom –
you have the freedom to become an air-base.”
From: “A Sad Kind Of Freedom”, by Nazim Hickmet (1902-1963) courtesy Rick Rozoff, Stop NATO*

 

by Felicity Arbuthnot
Published: Sep. 11, 2011 – Global Research

It is instructive to look at the plethora of 9/11, tenth anniversary pullouts in newspapers, to note the commemorative programmes, interviews, memories. The heartbreak, broken and lost lives: the ten year old, now twenty, who realized, horror struck, that her father was in the building she watched flaming and falling, on television.

There are spreads of other ten years olds, children unborn when their pregnant mother was widowed, by a terrible atrocity, on a sunlit day, in a city turned dark by smoke and ash. Pregnant survivors, say “experts”, passed their trauma to their children, we learn.

“Share your memories of 9/11 ten years on”, invite newspapers

Photographers have recalled: “the day of horror.”

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Libya and the world we live in

“Why are you attacking us? Why are you killing our children? Why are you destroying our infrastructure?”
Television address by Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, April 30, 2011

by William Blum
Published: Sep. 01, 2011 – Killinghope.org

A few hours later NATO hit a target in Tripoli, killing Gaddafi’s 29-year-old son Saif al-Arab, three of Gaddafi’s grandchildren, all under twelve years of age, and several friends and neighbors.

In his TV address, Gaddafi had appealed to the NATO nations for a cease-fire and negotiations after six weeks of bombings and cruise missile attacks against his country.

Well, let’s see if we can derive some understanding of the complex Libyan turmoil.

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War on Libya and Control of The Mediterranean

Libya is also one of only five of Africa’s 54 countries that have not been integrated into, which is to say subordinated to, the new U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM).

by Rick Rozoff
Published: Mar. 25, 2011 – Stop Nato

A year after assuming the post of president of the French Republic in 2007, and while his nation held the rotating European Union presidency, Nicolas Sarkozy invited the heads of state of the EU’s 27 members and those of 17 non-EU Mediterranean countries to attend a conference in Paris to launch a Mediterranean Union.

In the words of Britain’s Daily Telegraph regarding the subsequent summit held for the purpose on July 13, 2008, “Sarkozy’s big idea is to use imperial Rome’s centre of the world as a unifying factor linking 44 countries that are home to 800 million people.”

Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, however, announced that his nation would boycott the gathering, denouncing the initiative as one aimed at dividing both Africa and the Arab world, and stating:

“We shall have another Roman empire and imperialist design. There are imperialist maps and designs that we have already rolled up. We should not have them again.” [1]

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The Logic of Imperial Insanity and the Road to World War III

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Published: Jan. 14, 2011 – Global Research

In the late 1990s Brzezinski wrote up the design for America’s imperial project in the 21st century in his book, “The Grand Chessboard.” He stated bluntly that, “it is imperative that no Eurasian challenger emerges, capable of dominating Eurasia and thus of also challenging America,” and then made clear the imperial nature of his strategy:

To put it in a terminology that harkens back to the more brutal age of ancient empires, the three grand imperatives of imperial geostrategy are to prevent collusion and maintain security dependence among the vassals, to keep tributaries pliant and protected, and to keep the barbarians from coming together.[1]

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AFRICOM and the Recolonization of Africa

The Legacy of the Berlin Conference of 1884

by Itai Muchena
First Published: Apr. 07, 2010 – The Herald (Zimbabwe)

The hodgepodge of geometric boundaries that today divide Africa into 50 plus irregular nations under Eurocentric subjugation all started in Berlin, Germany on November 15, 1884.

The infamous Berlin Conference still remains Africa’s greatest undoing in more ways than one, where colonial powers superimposed their domains on the African continent and tore apart the social, political and economic fabric that held the continent together.

By the time independence returned to Africa between 1956 and 1994, the African realm had acquired a colonial legacy of political fragmentation that could neither be eliminated nor made to operate wholly independent from the former colonial masters.

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AFRICOM and the USA’s Hidden Battle for Africa

First Published: Mar. 30, 2010 – Accra Mail

What is the current meaning of “War against Terror” for Africa? The true intention of America’s recent military interventions in the African continent (both covert and open) is nothing other than the expansion and consolidation of Western capital.

It all started in 2001 when George W. Bush declared his “War on Terror” in the continent, but has developed in a manner that has gone beyond human imagination in the body counts on the streets of Somalia, in the jungles of Uganda and Congo, and deserts of Sudan.

The chief of the US African Command, General E. Ward, explained this in language more clear than that of any US politician when he stated that an Africa in which “African populations are able to provide for themselves, contribute to global economic development and are allowed access to markets in free, fair, and competitive ways, is good for America and the world…”

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The US-NATO Conquest of Africa

Militarization of the African Continent

by Rick Rozoff
First Published: Mar. 21, 2010 – Stop NATO

The world’s oldest extant military bloc (formed 61 years ago) and the largest in history (twenty eight full members and as many partners on five continents), the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, counts among its major member states all of Africa’s former colonial powers: Britain, France, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Germany and Belgium.

After World War II and the groundswell of anti-colonial sentiment throughout Africa and Asia, the European powers were forced to withdraw from most of the African continent, though Portugal retained its possessions until the 1970s.

Most every new African nation adopted some model of socialist-oriented economic and political development and the continent as a whole more closely aligned itself with the Soviet Union, which moreover had for decades supported the anti-colonial struggles in Africa, than with the West, both Western Europe and the United States.

With the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union nearly twenty years ago, the major Western powers on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, united under the aegis of NATO, saw that as with the Balkans and the former republics of the Soviet Union itself, Africa was now wide open for penetration and domination.

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