Documentary – Capitalism Is The Crisis (2011)

Published: Aug. 13, 2011 – Capitalism is the Crisis

Capitalism Is The Crisis: Radical Politics in the Age of Austerity examines the ideological roots of the “austerity” agenda and proposes revolutionary paths out of the current crisis. The film features original interviews with Chris Hedges, Derrick Jensen, Michael Hardt, Peter Gelderloos, Leo Panitch, David McNally, Richard J.F. Day, Imre Szeman, Wayne Price, and many more!

The 2008 “financial crisis” in the United States was a systemic fraud in which the wealthy finance capitalists stole trillions of public dollars. No one was jailed for this crime, the largest theft of public money in history.

Instead, the rich forced working people across the globe to pay for their “crisis” through punitive “austerity” programs that gutted public services and repealed workers’ rights.

Austerity was named “Word of the Year” for 2010.

This documentary explains the nature of capitalist crisis, visits the protests against austerity measures, and recommends revolutionary paths for the future.

Special attention is devoted to the crisis in Greece, the 2010 G20 Summit protest in Toronto, Canada, and the remarkable surge of solidarity in Madison, Wisconsin.

It may be their crisis, but it’s our problem.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Q2aVnPP1C4&feature=player_embedded#!

 

Related:

The World’s Super-Rich

People Of Earth: Prepare For Economic Disaster

Crisis as a Means to Building a Global Totalitarian State

18 Signs That Global Financial Markets Smell Blood In The Water

DOCUMENTARY – New Rulers of the World, by John Pilger

19 Reasons Why The Federal Reserve Is At The Heart Of Our Economic Problems

VIDEO – Overdose: The Next Financial Crisis

20 reasons America has lost its soul and collapse is inevitable (With Video)

VIDEO – The Dollar Bubble

The Planned Global Economic Crisis

VIDEO – Preparing Americans for Hyperinflation

The Rich Have Stolen The Economy

VIDEO – Meltup

DOCUMENTARY – The Corporation (Portuguese Subtitles)

Rothschilds & Rockefellers: Trillionaires Of The World

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Daylight Robbery, Meet Nighttime Robbery

by Naomi Klein
Published: Aug. 16, 2011 – The Nation

I keep hearing comparisons between the London riots and riots in other European cities—window smashing in Athens or car bonfires in Paris. And there are parallels, to be sure: a spark set by police violence, a generation that feels forgotten.

But those events were marked by mass destruction; the looting was minor. There have, however, been other mass lootings in recent years, and perhaps we should talk about them too. There was Baghdad in the aftermath of the US invasion—a frenzy of arson and looting that emptied libraries and museums. The factories got hit too. In 2004 I visited one that used to make refrigerators. Its workers had stripped it of everything valuable, then torched it so thoroughly that the warehouse was a sculpture of buckled sheet metal.

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UK banks fund deadly cluster-bomb industry

by Jerome Taylor
Published: Aug. 16, 2011 – The Independent

British high-street banks, including two institutions that were bailed out by taxpayers, are investing hundreds of millions of pounds in companies that manufacture cluster bombs – despite a growing global ban outlawing the production and trade of the weapons.

How cluster bombs work: click here to download graphic (71k)

The Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds TSB, Barclays and HSBC have all provided funding to the makers of cluster bombs, even as international opinion turns against a weapons system that is inherently indiscriminate and routinely maims or kills civilians.

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The Origins of Modern Banking

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. Already they have raised up a money aristocracy that has set the government at defiance. The issuing power should be taken from banks, and restored to the people.” Thomas Jefferson

by Kieron McFadden
Published: Nov. 04, 2002 – The Truth Seeker

Money was originally invented as a convenient alternative to barter, an alternative without which a highly developed civilisation like ours could not exist.

Imagine trying to pay the taxi driver with a bag of coal or the grocery bill with a box of spanners and a set of golf clubs. Imagine trying to carry all that around with you when you go shopping. As societies grew more complex and social roles became more specialised, the idea of money was conceived as a better and more flexible way to exchange, and thereby distribute among men, goods and services.

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