DRC Congo: Coltan, the new blood diamonds

Congo has 24 trillion dollars worth of untapped raw mineral deposits, holds 30% of the worlds Diamond reserves, 80% world’s Coltan.

Published: April 16, 2012 – Inform Africa

Since 1998, fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been prolonged as a consequence of the country’s vast mineral reserves, which includes diamonds, gold, tungsten, tin and Coltan.

Fighting has thought to have killed an estimated 5.4 million people, despite the continued presence of the world’s largest United Nations peacekeeping operation. (McHaney, S (2009) [Accessed16 June])

In 2008, there were 18,422 personnel at an annual cost of 1.2 billion. It has been widely documented that the production of coltan is ‘fuelling’ the war in Congo. (Vesperini, H (2001) [Accessed 16 June]) Due to this immense wealth of natural resources, various foreign powers, as well as internal, have fought for an advantage.

This is a conflict, which has largely gone unnoticed, and the desire for minerals has far outweighed the concern for life. As one Congolese male stated, it is almost as if the civilian population is an ‘inconvenience’ to the people who possess the mines and its resources. (The Independent, (2006) [Accessed 16 June]) It is these people who therefore are willing to kill, promote violence and prolong instability to keep control of this.

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MALI – France Fights for Rothschild Gold

FRENCH TROOPS IN MALI – After six days of aerial attacks, on January 16, 2013, French troops began to engage the Islamist rebels whose advances to the south are threatening to overthrow the unelected military regime – and the Rothschild-owned gold mines.

by Christopher Bollyn
Published: Jan. 19, 2013 – bollyn.com

The real reason for the French military intervention in Mali is to protect the foreign-owned gold mining operations, which produce hundreds of thousands of ounces of gold for the owners per year.

MALI IS ‘GOLD COUNTRY’ – Foreign investors profit from the gold of Mali while its people wallow in poverty.  Nine out of ten people in Mali live in dire poverty and 72 percent of the population survives on less than a dollar a day.  Ninety percent of the Malian population is Muslim. 

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NATO’s War on Libya is Directed against China: AFRICOM and the Threat to China’s National Energy Security

The Washington-led decision by NATO to bomb Gaddafi’s Libya into submission over recent months, at an estimated cost to US taxpayers of at least $1 billion, has little if anything to do with what the Obama Administration claims was a mission to “protect innocent civilians.” In reality it is part of a larger strategic assault by NATO and by the Pentagon in particular to entirely control China’s economic achilles heel, namely China’s strategic dependence on large volumes of imported crude oil and gas. Today China is the world’s second largest importer of oil after the United States and the gap is rapidly closing.

by F. William Engdahl
Published: Sep. 25, 2011 – Global Research

If we take a careful look at a map of Africa and also look at the African organization of the new Pentagon Africa Command—AFRICOM—the pattern that emerges is a careful strategy of controlling one of China’s most strategically important oil and raw materials sources.

NATO’s Libya campaign was and is all about oil. But not about simply controlling Libyan high-grade crude because the USA is nervous about reliable foreign supplies. It rather is about controlling China’s free access to long-term oil imports from Africa and from the Middle East. In other words, it is about controlling China itself.

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The war against Libya in historical perspective

From the Berlin Conference of 1884 to the London Conference of 2011

by Brian Becker
Published: Mar. 30, 2011 – Liberation News

The leaders of 14 capitalist powers in Europe plus the United States met for a conference in Berlin 126 years ago to decide how all of Africa’s land and vast resources would be divided as colonies and zones of control among themselves. No Africans were invited to the conference.

The 1884 Conference of Berlin, more than any other single event, became emblematic of the dynamic transformation of capitalism into a system of global imperialism.

By 1902, 90 percent of Africa’s territory was under European control. African self-governance was wiped off the map in most of the continent. Only Ethiopia remained an independent state. Liberia was technically independent too, but it was in fact under the control of the United States.

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Documentary – BLOOD DIAMONDS: The True Story (2006)

Documentary exploring infamous historical events. This instalment examines the little-known truth about how the worldwide diamond trade has funded wars across western and central Africa, leading to the deaths of millions of people.

Blood Diamonds: The True Story combines firsthand accounts from survivors and perpetrators of the African diamond-funded wars with testimony from a range of industry experts and journalists. Along with remarkable accounts of the true horrors of these hidden wars comes an exploration of the worldwide fascination with diamonds, the difficulties of obtaining justice for the millions of people who have suffered through the illegal diamond trade, and the complexity of adapting the industry to benefit the people of Africa.


AFRICOM and the Recolonization of Africa

The Legacy of the Berlin Conference of 1884

by Itai Muchena
First Published: Apr. 07, 2010 – The Herald (Zimbabwe)

The hodgepodge of geometric boundaries that today divide Africa into 50 plus irregular nations under Eurocentric subjugation all started in Berlin, Germany on November 15, 1884.

The infamous Berlin Conference still remains Africa’s greatest undoing in more ways than one, where colonial powers superimposed their domains on the African continent and tore apart the social, political and economic fabric that held the continent together.

By the time independence returned to Africa between 1956 and 1994, the African realm had acquired a colonial legacy of political fragmentation that could neither be eliminated nor made to operate wholly independent from the former colonial masters.

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The US-NATO Conquest of Africa

Militarization of the African Continent

by Rick Rozoff
First Published: Mar. 21, 2010 – Stop NATO

The world’s oldest extant military bloc (formed 61 years ago) and the largest in history (twenty eight full members and as many partners on five continents), the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, counts among its major member states all of Africa’s former colonial powers: Britain, France, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Germany and Belgium.

After World War II and the groundswell of anti-colonial sentiment throughout Africa and Asia, the European powers were forced to withdraw from most of the African continent, though Portugal retained its possessions until the 1970s.

Most every new African nation adopted some model of socialist-oriented economic and political development and the continent as a whole more closely aligned itself with the Soviet Union, which moreover had for decades supported the anti-colonial struggles in Africa, than with the West, both Western Europe and the United States.

With the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union nearly twenty years ago, the major Western powers on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, united under the aegis of NATO, saw that as with the Balkans and the former republics of the Soviet Union itself, Africa was now wide open for penetration and domination.

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A New World War for a New World Order

The Origins of World War III: Part 3

This article is Part 3 in the Series, “The Origins of World War III.”

Part 1: An Imperial Strategy for a New World Order: The Origins of World War III
Part 2: Colour-Coded Revolutions and the Origins of World War III

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Published: Dec. 17, 2009 – Global Research

Introduction

In Parts 1 and 2 of this series, I have analyzed US and NATO geopolitical strategy since the fall of the Soviet Union, in expanding the American empire and preventing the rise of new powers, containing Russia and China. This Part examines the implications of this strategy in recent years; following the emergence of a New Cold War, as well as analyzing the war in Georgia, the attempts and methods of regime change in Iran, the coup in Honduras, the expansion of the Afghan-Pakistan war theatre, and spread of conflict in Central Africa. These processes of a New Cold War and major regional wars and conflicts take the world closer to a New World War. Peace can only be possible if the tools and engines of empires are dismantled.

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“Why we fight”: The Nature of Modern Imperialism

Aggressive and exclusive military alliances like NATO should be disbanded

by Alan Mackinnon
First Published: Nov. 17, 2009 – Scottish Left Review

The world of war is today dominated by a single superpower. In military terms the United States sits astride the world like a giant Colossus. As a country with only five per cent of the world’s population it accounts for almost 50 per cent of global arms spending. Its 11 naval carrier fleets patrol every ocean and its 909 military bases are scattered strategically across every continent. No other country has reciprocal bases on US territory – it would be unthinkable and unconstitutional. It is 20 years since the end of the Cold War and the United States and its allies face no significant military threat today. Why then have we not had the hoped-for peace dividend? Why does the world’s most powerful nation continue to increase its military budget, now over $1.2 trillion a year in real terms? What threat is all this supposed to counter?

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Global Warfare USA: The World is the Pentagon’s Oyster

US military operations in all major regions of the World

“Not only does one country account for the overwhelming plurality of world military expenditures, but that nation also has troops and bases on all six habitable continents (as well as a 54-year military mission in Antarctica, Operation Deep Freeze) and eleven aircraft carrier strike groups and six navy fleets that roam the world’s oceans and seas at will. It is also expanding a global interceptor missile system on land, on sea, in the air and into space that will leave it invulnerable to retaliation.”

by Rick Rozoff
Published: Nov. 16, 2009 – Global Research

On January 20, a changing of the guard occurred in the United States White House with two-term president George W. Bush being replaced by former freshman senator Barack Obama.

Bush had continued the policies of his predecessor Bill Clinton in relation to the Balkans, Iraq and Latin America – with troops and a massive military base in Kosovo, regular bombings of Iraq and a monumental expansion of military aid to Colombia – and in addition launched two wars of his own, those against Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq two years later.

Obama, so thoroughly does U.S. polity predetermine individual administrations’ policies, entered office by intensifying the deadly drone missile attacks in Pakistan begun by Bush in late 2008 and announced that he was doubling the number of American troops in Afghanistan.

Already presiding over the world’s largest military budget, officially 41.5% of world expenditures in 2008 and far larger with non-Defense Department spending factored in, in April the new president requested from Congress an additional $85 billion in supplemental funding for the war in Afghanistan and the occupation of Iraq.

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Africa alone could feed the world…

DOOM-MONGERS have got it wrong – there is enough space in the world to produce the extra food needed to feed a growing population. And contrary to expectation, most of it can be grown in Africa, say two international reports published this week.

The first, projecting 10 years into the future from last year’s food crisis, which saw the price of food soar, says that there is plenty of unused, fertile land available to grow more crops.

“Some 1.6 billion hectares could be added to the current 1.4 billion hectares of crop land [in the world], and over half of the additionally available land is found in Africa and Latin America,” concludes the report, compiled by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

If further evidence were needed, it comes in a second report, launched jointly by the FAO and the World Bank. It concludes that 400 million hectares, straddling 25 African countries, are suitable for farming.

Models for producing new crop land already exist in Thailand, where land originally deemed agriculturally unpromising, due to irrigation problems and infertile soil, has been transformed into a cornucopia by smallholder farmers.

As in Thailand, future success will come by using agriculture to lift Africa’s smallholder farmers out of poverty, aided by strong government measures to guarantee their rights to land, say both reports.

Source: New Scientist